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  1. Environmental Changes to Crops May Have Ties to Health/Market Value

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/environmental-changes-crops-may-have-ties-healthmarket-value

    May 7, 2002 WOOSTER, Ohio- Something as simple as moisture levels or heat stress can alter the chemical characteristics of a vegetable crop, which may change its nutritional or market value. Ohio State University vegetable researchers are studying how far ...

  2. Early Bird Economic Outlook for Early Risers at FSR

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/early-bird-economic-outlook-early-risers-fsr

    September 5, 2006 LONDON, Ohio-- Early risers looking for the scoop on economic, business or policy issues will have the opportunity to check out new sessions at Ohio State University's Farm Science Review that kick off when the gates open.   Matt Ro ...

  3. Dry Weather May Lead to Stalk Lodging in Corn

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/dry-weather-may-lead-stalk-lodging-corn

    August 29, 2008 WOOSTER, Ohio-- Despite recent rain from the remnants of Fay, parts of Ohio remain abnormally dry, and the drought-like conditions may cause stalk rot and lodging problems in corn.   Pierce Paul, an Ohio State University plant pathologist ...

  4. Dry Weather Inviting Soybean Pests

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/dry-weather-inviting-soybean-pests

    September 3, 2008 WOOSTER, Ohio-- Abnormally dry conditions continue to plague Ohio, and lack of rain has been inviting pest problems for the state's soybean crop.   Two-spotted spider mites become active when fields are dry, and Ohio State Universit ...

  5. Education, Not Regulation Key to Improving Animal Welfare

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/education-not-regulation-key-improving-animal-welfare

    June 18, 2009 COLUMBUS, Ohio-- Education, not regulation, and changing attitudes, not facilities, are the keys to improving animal well-being on the farm.   James Kinder, chair of Ohio State University's Department of Animal Sciences, said that the a ...

  6. Don't Panic. Soybean Rust is Manageable

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/dont-panic-soybean-rust-manageable

    November 12, 2004 WOOSTER, Ohio — With soybean rust now officially confirmed in the United States, the more educated Ohio growers are about the fungus, the better prepared they will be to manage it if it is ever diagnosed closer to home.   The U.S. Depart ...

  7. Don't Pass Up Rare Opportunity to Make Fall Fertilizer Applications

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/dont-pass-rare-opportunity-make-fall-fertilizer-applications

    November 8, 2010 WOOSTER, Ohio – With corn and soybean harvest ahead of schedule in Ohio, farmers are encouraged to make their fertilizer applications now.   "This is a rare opportunity for farmers," said Robert Mullen, an Ohio State University ...

  8. Don't Let Slugs Rule the Roost in No-Till Fields

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/dont-let-slugs-rule-roost-no-till-fields

    February 5, 2002 WOOSTER, Ohio- In the battle against slugs, a sharp eye and savvy management tactics may mean the difference between a damaged crop and successful yields for no-till farmers. "Growers need to be aware of what's going on in their ...

  9. Don't Let Late Soybean Harvest Slow Down Wheat Preparation

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/dont-let-late-soybean-harvest-slow-down-wheat-preparation

    September 14, 2004 WOOSTER, Ohio — Late soybean harvest may impact Ohio wheat planting, but growers should take steps to prepare for next season's crop, nonetheless.   Pat Lipps, an Ohio State University plant pathologist with the Ohio Agricultural R ...

  10. Don't Forget Disease Resistance When Choosing Corn Hybrids

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/dont-forget-disease-resistance-when-choosing-corn-hybrids

    December 19, 2006 COLUMBUS, Ohio-- Disease resistance shouldn't be overlooked when choosing corn hybrids for next season, especially if growers plan to make the switch to continuous corn.   Peter Thomison, an Ohio State University Extension agronomis ...

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